February 11, 2021

By: Rebecca Moll Freed, Avi D. Kelin

Rebecca Moll Freed and Avi Kelin Publish Blog for Lawline Entitled "Calling All Government Contractors: What Vendors Need to Know About Political-Contribution Disclosures"

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Firm Partner and Corporate Political Activity Law Practice Chair Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq. and Senior Associate Avi D. Kelin, Esq. recently penned a blog entitled "Calling All Government Contractors: What Vendors Need to Know About Political-Contribution Disclosures" which has been published by Lawline Blog

With 2020 now in the books, individuals and businesses are starting to prepare their annual tax returns for the just-concluded year. But businesses need to also be aware of the annual pay-to-play filings that are due in the coming weeks.

Pay-to-play laws are statutes that impose certain requirements and restrictions on current and prospective government contractors. Pay-to-play laws sit at the intersection of government contracting and campaign-finance. The stated goals of these laws are generally to increase transparency in government contracting and to ensure that government contracts are awarded based on qualifications and expertise rather than favoritism. To further these goals, many states and local government entities throughout the country have adopted laws that, in some cases, impose reduced contribution limits on businesses and their key people when those businesses hold or wish to pursue government contracts. In other jurisdictions, government contractors are required to make disclosures of political contributions on a pre-contract basis or on an annual basis. These disclosures may be stand-alone disclosures or may be in addition to reduced pay-to-play limits.

While there is much ground to cover in the world of pay-to-play law, this blog provides an overview of selected upcoming annual pay-to-play disclosures.

Please click here to read the article in full.

Tags: Genova Burns LLCRebecca Moll FreedAvi D. KelinLawlineCorporate Political ActivityPay to PlayGovernment ContractorPennsylvaniaNew Jersey

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